Differences Between Tender Points and Trigger Points

From Fibro Wiki
Jump to: navigation, search

Characteristics of myofascial trigger points[edit]

Mense gives the following list of characteristics of the myofascial trigger points of myofascial pain syndrome: “(1) palpable nodule, often located close to the muscle belly, (2) often single, (3) allodynia and hyperalgesia at the MTrP, (4) referral of the MTrP pain, (5) normal pain sensitivity outside the MTrPs, (6) local twitch response, (7) local contracture in biopsy material, (8) peripheral mechanism probable.” [Article in German] Mense S. Schmerz. 2011 Feb;25(1):93-103; quiz 104.) (For a link to the table of contents and introduction to a book about myofascial trigger points by leaders in the field see: Myofascial Trigger Points: Pathophysiology and Evidence-Informed Diagnosis and Management, Edited by Jan Dommerholt and Peter Huijbregets, available in full online at: http://samples.jbpub.com/9780763779740/79740_FMxx_FINAL.pdf.)

Characteristics of fibromyalgia tender points[edit]

Mense (2011) gives the following list of characteristics of fibromyalgia tender points: “(1) no palpable nodule, (2) location often close to the muscle attachments, (3) multiple by definition, (4) allodynia and hyperalgesia also outside the TePs, (5) enhanced pain under psychic stress, (6) unspecific histological changes in biopsy material, (7) central nervous mechanism probable.” (Differences between myofascial trigger points and tender points. [Article in German] Mense S. Schmerz. 2011 Feb;25(1):93-103; quiz 104.) (For a link to the table of contents and introduction to a book about myofascial trigger points by leaders in the field see: Myofascial Trigger Points: Pathophysiology and Evidence-Informed Diagnosis and Management, Edited by Jan Dommerholt and Peter Huijbregets, Jones and Bartlett Publishers, Sudbury, MA, 201, available in full online at: http://samples.jbpub.com/9780763779740/79740_FMxx_FINAL.pdf.)

Author’s comment[edit]

I have seen patients with fibromyalgia who mainly just had tender points, but pressing on some them resulted in distant radiation of pain, thus indicating that they may have been trigger points.

Further information on myofascial trigger points[edit]

(A Systematic Comparison Between Subjects with No Pain and Pain Associated with Active Myofascial Trigger Points. Lynn H. Gerber, Siddhartha Sikdar, Katee Armstrong, Guoqing Diao, Juliana Heimur, John Kopecky, Diego Turo, Paul Otto, Tadesse Gebreab, and Jay Shah, PM & R : the journal of injury, function, and rehabilitation. 2013;5(11):931-938 available in full online at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3906203/.)